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Could Bees 3D-Print Concrete Structures in the Cities of the Future?

Geoff Manaugh bees, John Becker bees, 3d printing bees, 3d printer, 3d printing technology, silkworms architecture, MIT pavilion, vase-shaped hive, bees technology, Tomas Libertiny

Bees already pollinate the great majority of our fruits and veggies – but could they build our buildings as well? Former Gizmodo Editor-in-Chief Geoff Manaugh, and designer John Becker came up a plan to use bees to 3D print architectural structures using geometric formwork. In the plan bees serve as 3D printer printheads, and their honey-making glands would produce concrete instead of honey.

McDonald’s Japan Shuns Chinese Chicken Amidst Tainted Meat Scandal

husi, chicken, china, chinese,meat, tainted, scandal, japan, mcdonalds, osi, mcnuggets

China’s meat industry was recently dealt another blow as McDonald’s Japan announced plans to stop importing Chinese chicken for sale in its restaurants. According to The Guardian, the decision is a result of the recent food safety scandal centered around Shanghai-based Husi Foods (the Chinese arm of U.S.-based OSI Group), which is accused of repackaging and selling meat past its expiry date. In light of customer concerns around tainted meat from China, the company will now be sourcing mean for its eight chicken dishes from Thailand instead.

Breakthrough Honeycomb Lithium-Ion Batteries Could Boost EV Range to 300 Miles

A team from the Stanford School of Engineering has made a breakthrough in lithium-ion battery design that is expected to result in more stable batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and significantly reduce their cost. By taking inspiration from the structure of honeycomb, the team has resolved the issue of dendrite formation on the batteries, a mossy-looking leak of lithium ions that reduces efficiency and can pose a fire hazard. The result is a lithium-anode battery that could give a range of up to 300 miles and reduce the cost of an EV with that kind of range down to around $25,000.



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