Habitat for Orphan Girls Crowned 2018 House of the Year by The Architectural Review

Habitat for Orphan Girls in Khansar, Iran by ZAV Architects. Image via The Architectural Review Habitat for Orphan Girls in Khansar, Iran by ZAV Architects. Image via The Architectural Review

The Architectural Review has chosen a Habitat for Orphan Girls in Iran by ZAV Architects as the 2018 House of the Year. A competition staged by the publication every year, the AR House Awards identify “originality and excellence in the design of dwellings,” recognizing private houses which go beyond the core function of shelter, and become “an object of fantasy, a source of delight, a talisman, and a testing ground. 

The ninth edition of the awards saw six projects chosen from a shortlist of 16, which contained schemes from the UK, Ireland, Spain, Scandinavia, Canada, Latin America, Iran, Vietnam, India, Nepal, and Japan. Previous winners have included David Chipperfield’s Fayland House in 2015UID Architects’ Cosmic House in 2016, and the anti-seismic prototype in 2017 by Edward Ng, Wan Li and Xinan Chi

The six recognized projects, which consist of one overall winner, two high commendations, and three commendations, are listed below.

Winner

Habitat for Orphan Girls in Khansar, Iran / ZAV Architects

Habitat for Orphan Girls in Khansar, Iran by ZAV Architects. Image via The Architectural Review Habitat for Orphan Girls in Khansar, Iran by ZAV Architects. Image via The Architectural Review

The Habitat for Orphan Girls, situated in the foothills of Iran’s Zagros mountains, was chosen as the overall winner. The scheme seeks to give vulnerable children a safe, culturally sensitive environment through an experimentation with new and alternative forms of home life.

Jury member Marie-Jose Van Hee described the scheme as “an atypical project that has no ambitions in the architectural sense of monumentality [however] the expression of the “inner” quality is monumental – and also brave.”

High Commendations

House in Nobeoka / Schemata Architects

House in Nobeoka by Schemata Architects. Image © Takumi Ota House in Nobeoka by Schemata Architects. Image © Takumi Ota
House in Nobeoka by Schemata Architects. Image © Jan Vranovsky House in Nobeoka by Schemata Architects. Image © Jan Vranovsky

Binh House in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam /  Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Binh House in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Oki Binh House in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Oki
Binh House in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Oki Binh House in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Image © Hiroyuki Oki

Commendations

Casa Bruma in Valle de Bravo, Mexico /  Fernanda Canales & Claudia Rodríguez

Casa Bruma in Valle de Bravo, Mexico by Fernanda Canales & Claudia Rodríguez. Image © Rafael Gamo Casa Bruma in Valle de Bravo, Mexico by Fernanda Canales & Claudia Rodríguez. Image © Rafael Gamo
Casa Bruma in Valle de Bravo, Mexico by Fernanda Canales & Claudia Rodríguez. Image © Rafael Gamo Casa Bruma in Valle de Bravo, Mexico by Fernanda Canales & Claudia Rodríguez. Image © Rafael Gamo

Casa IV in Elche, Spain /  Mesura

Casa IV in Elche, Spain by Mesura. Image © Pedro Pegenaute Casa IV in Elche, Spain by Mesura. Image © Pedro Pegenaute
Casa IV in Elche, Spain by Mesura. Image © Pedro Pegenaute Casa IV in Elche, Spain by Mesura. Image © Pedro Pegenaute

Kokoon / Helsinki’s Aalto University Wood Programme, Finland

Kokoon by Helsinki’s Aalto University Wood Programme, Finland. Image © Tuomas Uusheimo Kokoon by Helsinki’s Aalto University Wood Programme, Finland. Image © Tuomas Uusheimo
Kokoon by Helsinki’s Aalto University Wood Programme, Finland. Image © Marc Goodwin Kokoon by Helsinki’s Aalto University Wood Programme, Finland. Image © Marc Goodwin

The remaining projects on the shortlist were as follows:

The 2018 jury was comprised of Chilean architect Mathias Klotz, Belgium-based architect Marie-Jose Van Hee, and British architect Amin Taha.

News via: The Architectural Review