How Robotic Parking Systems Enable Urban Architecture

Located at the old harborfront of Arhus, Denmark, DOKK1 designed by Schmidt Hammer Lassen architects houses not only Scandinavia’s largest library but also Europe’s largest public robotic parking system. Photograph by Adam Mork. Located at the old harborfront of Arhus, Denmark, DOKK1 designed by Schmidt Hammer Lassen architects houses not only Scandinavia’s largest library but also Europe’s largest public robotic parking system. Photograph by Adam Mork.

Saving space, reducing costs and a pleasant user experience – parking doesn’t get much better than this.

Cityscapes around the world are changing, architects face the constant challenge of integrating parking space into new or existing real estate in densely built-up urban environments. While there is a growing ambition to replace cars as a prime mobility tool, we’re far from realizing this goal. Most downtown revitalizations today require structured parking. Where space is tight, access ramp or radius of a conventional parking garage may be hard to fit. Because robotic parking systems require neither these nor access for pedestrians, they can place up to 60% more cars in the same space – increasing the RoI on parking spaces Alternatively, the same number of cars can be parked in 60% of the space of a conventional parking garage, creating significant cost savings in the construction phase. In either case, the user experience in robotic parking systems – brightly lit entrance areas, safe vehicle retrieval processes and reduced car fumes as the search for parking is effectively eliminated – is second to none.

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