ArchiWEB Explorer: Architects

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012: A Day in the Life of an Architect

What does a day in the Life of an Architect look like? There are a lot of different answers to that question and even if I look at what my day looks like, it has varied over the years as I move through my career and took on different roles and responsibilities.

Architect's Alarm Clock

A Selection of the World’s Best Architects

© Ossip Van Duivenbode. ImageTianjin Binhai Library / MVRDV + Tianjin Urban Planning and Design Institute © Ossip Van Duivenbode. ImageTianjin Binhai Library / MVRDV + Tianjin Urban Planning and Design Institute

To rank architects, or to even pretend that any list or selection would be exhaustive and/or apply to the individual tastes of every architecture lover, seems, on the surface, a pointless task. However, as we move away from looking for inspiration from merely the great masters or the handful of contemporary firms studied in academic programs, it is important to shine a light on the works that we, as ArchDaily editors, have found particularly valuable. Of the thousands of architects whose projects have been selected to be published on our site, we occasionally notice firms whose work stands out. Whether we’re drawn to their innovative approach to practice, the role they play in contributing to their local communities, or their generosity, we are eager to display their work as an example, so that others may be inspired to challenge the status quo.

With editors from Brazil, the US, Mexico, Chile, China and Northern Ireland, and thanks to the extensive network that we have forged with institutions in Africa, Asia and beyond, we have the rare opportunity to go beyond a purely western-focused overview of the state of today’s architecture.

Spotlight: Arata Isozaki

Qatar National Convention Centre. Image © Nelson Garrido Qatar National Convention Centre. Image © Nelson Garrido

Japanese architect, teacher, and theorist Arata Isozaki (born 23 July, 1931) helped bring Japanese influence to some of the most prestigious buildings of the 20th century, and continues to work at the highest level today. Initially working in a distinctive form of modernism, Isozaki developed his own thoughts and theories on architecture into a complex style that invokes pure shape and space as much as it evokes post-modern ideas. Highly adaptable and socially concerned, his work has been acclaimed for being sensitive to context while still making statements of its own.

Spotlight: Richard Rogers

Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/2496569412'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> Centre Georges Pompidou / Richard Rogers + Renzo Piano. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/dalbera/2496569412'>Flickr user dalbera</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

As one of the leading architects of the British High-Tech movement, Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers stands out as one of the most innovative and distinctive architects of a generation. Rogers made his name in the 1970s and '80s, with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Headquarters for Lloyd's Bank in London.

Opening Lines: Sketchbooks of Ten Modern Architects

Álvaro Siza (*1933) Évora, Quinta da Malagueira Caderno 1, 1977, Ink on paper, 300 x 210 mm, Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, © The Architect Álvaro Siza (*1933) Évora, Quinta da Malagueira Caderno 1, 1977, Ink on paper, 300 x 210 mm, Image Courtesy Drawing Matter, © The Architect

Opening Lines: Sketchbooks of Ten Modern Architects, an exhibition drawn from the Drawing Matter collection, with additional loans from selected architects, is dedicated to architectural sketchbooks in practice and on display.

Spotlight: Norman Foster

Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young Spaceport America. Image © Nigel Young

Arguably the leading name of a generation of internationally high-profile British architects, Norman Foster (born 1 June 1935)—or to give him his full title Norman Robert Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank of Reddish, OM, HonFREng—gained recognition as early as the 1970s as a key architect in the high-tech movement, which continues to have a profound impact on architecture as we know it today.

Spotlight: Frei Otto

Munich Olympic Stadium. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn Munich Olympic Stadium. Image © Atelier Frei Otto Warmbronn

German architect and structural engineer Frei Otto (31 May 1925 – 9 March 2015) was well known for his pioneering innovations in lightweight and tensile structures. Shortly before his death in 2015 he was awarded the Pritzker Prize and prior to that he was awarded the RIBA Royal Gold Medal in 2006. Much of his research in lightweight structures is as relevant today as when he first proposed them over 60 years ago, and his work continues to inform architects and engineers to this day.

How a Smart Office Makes Work Easier

Beyond automated cleaning gadgets, futuristic sensors, and sleek screens, using smart technology is more than just a fashion statement or an attempt at looking modern and “in the know”. These are practical measures taken to make sure that workers are comfortable during work while helping them increase their efficiency and productivity.

Looking at the way business is being done these days, collaboration has become pivotal to the success of a campaign or project. One misstep in communication may mean trouble for those barely managing their respective teams. So with the advent of smart technology, work life is greatly improved by the many ways it creates a connected experience in the office.

Let’s explore the reasons smart technology can help make office life, and indeed the way we do work, easier.

Smart software cuts unnecessary processing time

Certain, manual processes take an awfully long time to finish. This eats up man hours that should have been spent finishing tasks. Spending way too much time keeping records and processing billing manually affects that speed with which we close a project. That is why we often find ourselves rushing to finish them near the deadline.

"Architette": Bringing Value to Women Architects in Their Professional Field

Courtesy of RebelArchitette Courtesy of RebelArchitette

There is no female pronoun for architect in Italian, so a new project, Architette, was born aiming to professionally promote the female title in Italian. The project's objective consists of monitoring all-male juries and conferences, mentoring young generations on the ground to advocate for a more heterogeneous and fair professional landscape, where women can be an inspirational reference in architecture. 

Spotlight: Rafael Moneo

National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2842858053'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> National Museum of Roman Art. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictfactory/2842858053'>Flickr user pictfactory</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>

As the first ever Spanish architect to receive the Pritzker PrizeRafael Moneo (born 9 May 1937) is known for his highly contextual buildings which nonetheless remain committed to modernist stylings. His designs are regularly credited as achieving the elusive quality of "timelessness"; as critic Robert Campbell wrote in his essay about Moneo for the Pritzker Prize, "a Moneo building creates an awareness of time by remembering its antecedents. It then layers this memory against its mission in the contemporary world."