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City Unseen

City Unseen: New Visions of an Urban Planet
Karen C. Seto, Meredith Reba
Yale University Press, September 2018



Hardcover | 9 x 10 inches | 268 pages | 188 illustrations | English | ISBN: 978-0300221695 | $35.00

Publisher Description:
Seeing cities around the globe in their larger environmental contexts, we begin to understand how the world shapes urban landscapes and how urban landscapes shape the world. Authors Karen Seto and Meredith Reba provide these revealing views to enhance readers’ understanding of the shape, growth, and life of urban settlements of all sizes—from the remote town of Namche Bazaar in Nepal to the vast metropolitan prefecture of Tokyo, Japan.

Using satellite data, the authors show urban landscapes in new perspectives. The book’s beautiful and surprising images pull back the veil on familiar scenes to highlight the growth of cities over time, the symbiosis between urban form and natural landscapes, and the vulnerabilities of cities to the effects of climate change. We see the growth of Las Vegas and Lagos, the importance of rivers to both connecting and dividing cities like Seoul and London, and the vulnerability of Fukushima and San Juan to floods from tsunami or hurricanes. The result is a compelling book that shows cities’ relationships with geography, food, and society.
dDAB Commentary:

Google Reveals Revised Mountain View Campus Plan by BIG and Heatherwick Studio

Google Mountain View Campus. Image Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group & Heatherwick Studio Google Mountain View Campus. Image Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group & Heatherwick Studio

New details of Google's Mountain View campus by BIG and Heatherwick Studio have been revealed. Initially announced in 2015, the project has seen several revisions after first running into difficulty with the city planning board. The latest scheme includes a combination of office, retail, public and residential space. Located in North Bayshore, California, the revised plan focuses on the site's natural environment and affordable housing.

Come Hell or High Water: Cities Must Evolve in the Face of Climate Change

[ By SA Rogers in Architecture & Cities & Urbanism. ]

The time to talk about climate change as if it’s merely a hazy possibility that won’t occur in our lifetime anyway has long passed. Multiple recent reports have made it clear that it’s already happening, and its effects will be much worse than previously expected.

In 2016, the Paris climate accords set a goal of limiting global warming to two degrees Celsius (at which it’s already failing); the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change now says two degrees is both inevitable by the year 2040 and genocidal, set to cause the death of all coral reefs, extreme wildfires, heat waves and other weather events that will subsequently threaten the world’s food supply and transform the global economy.

Call for Submissions: 2018 Holiday Card Challenge

It's time to get into the Holiday Spirit! As we've done for the past few years, we're seeking holiday cards with an architectural spin to feature on ArchDaily. We expect abundant puns and festively decorated classic buildings. :)

Competition Guidelines:

  • Design must be submitted as a .jpg/.png/.gif
  • Format is 1800 x 1200 pixels (vertical or horizontal)
  • Design must be original and suitable for publication on ArchDaily
  • The theme for the design can be Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, New Years, etc.
  • All entries must be received by December 17 at 10PM EST
  • You may submit more than one entry
  • Our favorite submissions will be published 

Architecture is a Corporate Product - and We're All Buying

Google Dublin. Image © Peter Wurmli Google Dublin. Image © Peter Wurmli

Architecture, unlike other aspects of culture (such as fashion or music), can only really be experienced and understood in person. For highly branded companies, designing a new building can be a prime opportunity to signal taste and values - but also creates an interesting architectural conundrum. While the buildings will be inhabited (nearly 24/7) by company employees, they’re also very much populated by the imaginations of people across the globe. What is it like to be in these places?

Top 20 A' Design Award Winners

Courtesy of A’ Design Awards Courtesy of A’ Design Awards

The A’ Design Award is an international award whose aim is to provide designers, architects, and innovators from all architecture and design fields with a competitive platform to showcase their work and products to a global audience. Among the design world's many awards, the A' Design Award stands out for its exceptional scale and breadth; in 2015, over 1,000 different designs received awards, with all fields of design recognized by the award's 100 different categories. This year's edition is now open for entries; designers can register their submissions here.

Organized as a way to showcase excellent designers in all disciplines and from all countries, the A' Awards are peer-reviewed and anonymously judged by an influential jury panel of experienced scholars, important press members, and experienced professionals. The awards offer prestige, publicity and international recognition to A’ Design Award Laureates through the coveted A’ Design Prize system. You can learn more about the call for entries process here.

"Post-Digital" Drawing Valorizes the Ordinary and Renders it to Look Like the Past

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Can’t Be Bothered: The Chic Indifference of Post-Digital Drawing."

In architectural circles, the appellation “post-digital” has come to mean many things to many people. Some have used it as a shorthand descriptor for the trendy style of rendering that has become popular among students and, increasingly, architectural offices. Others have used it to describe a more profound shift in architectural production that is at once inoculated against the novelty of digital technique and attuned to the sheer ubiquity of “the digital” in contemporary life.  

How a Smart Office Makes Work Easier

Beyond automated cleaning gadgets, futuristic sensors, and sleek screens, using smart technology is more than just a fashion statement or an attempt at looking modern and “in the know”. These are practical measures taken to make sure that workers are comfortable during work while helping them increase their efficiency and productivity.

Looking at the way business is being done these days, collaboration has become pivotal to the success of a campaign or project. One misstep in communication may mean trouble for those barely managing their respective teams. So with the advent of smart technology, work life is greatly improved by the many ways it creates a connected experience in the office.

Let’s explore the reasons smart technology can help make office life, and indeed the way we do work, easier.

Smart software cuts unnecessary processing time

Certain, manual processes take an awfully long time to finish. This eats up man hours that should have been spent finishing tasks. Spending way too much time keeping records and processing billing manually affects that speed with which we close a project. That is why we often find ourselves rushing to finish them near the deadline.

Bye Bye Boring Workspace: 12 Office Arrangements That Feel Fresh & Fun

[ By SA Rogers in Design & Furniture & Decor. ]

Fun workspace features like slides and outlandishly creative office design schemes get a lot of attention, but ultimately, the individual workspaces where employees carry out most of their daily tasks are more germane to both happiness and productivity. Should they be private, or prioritize openness and collaboration? Should they be serious, or a little quirky and fun? These 12 modern workspaces show how various companies and designers have answered those questions, and most of the time, the solutions are somewhere in between – with a heavy emphasis on adaptability and choice.

Treehouse 2 by Dymitr Malcew

How To Add People To Your Renders Like a Pro

The proposed plan for the TheaterSquared’s mainstage. Image © Charcoalblue. Rendering by Kilograph. The proposed plan for the TheaterSquared’s mainstage. Image © Charcoalblue. Rendering by Kilograph.

It’s no mystery why we put people in our designs. People are the quickest way to an emotional connection. With the right visual cues, you can evoke deep feelings, turning a simple image into a source of awe or aspiration. In architectural visualization, we try to shape those feelings, working off the perceptions most of us share. While we are all creatures of circumstance, using our experiential knowledge to guide us day-to-day, a lot of our conditioning is the same. Which is why it is so important to consider how you use people when you create visualizations of your designs.

Entourage are your visual guides, alerting the viewer to the story or feelings you want to convey. Sometimes that story is one of usage, an explanation of how someone interacts or moves about a space. Other times, it’s a bit more abstract. Whatever the direction, the art of entourage is really a study of composition, conditioning, and narrative. The more you know about each topic, the better your visualization will turn out—especially when you have a complicated brief.