All items from Daily Dose of Architecture

Mark Your Calendars: Arakawa + Gins

On March 30, Columbia GSAPP is hosting a conference and opening an exhibition, both pertaining to Arakawa and Madeline Gins. Details are below.


[Critical Holder Chart 2 (detail), c1991 / Image Credit: © 2017 Estate of Madeline Gins.]

Encounters with Arakawa and Madeline Gins
Conference in Wood Auditorium, Avery Hall, at 1pm:
A half-day conference on the occasion of the opening of the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery exhibition Arakawa and Madeline Gins: Eternal Gradient. The event convenes architects, artists, historians and writers to offer fresh interpretations of Arakawa and Gins’ work and theories in the context of contemporary practices and scholarship.

Among the conference participants are:
Amale Andraos, Dean of Columbia GSAPP and co-founder of WORKac;
Adrienne Hart, Artistic Director/Choreographer of Neon Dance (London), who is developing a new dance piece that draws on the life and work of Arakawa and Gins;
Momoyo Homma (Tokyo), Director of Co-ordinologist Inc.;
Lucy Ives (New York), an author who is currently editing a collection of writings by Gins;
Andrés Jaque (Madrid/New York), founder of Office for Political Innovation;

Mark Your Calendars, Updated

Way back in February 2015 I posted a heads up on three exhibitions coming to the Parrish Art Museum – that barn-shaped building designed by Herzog & de Meuron. One of them, Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture, was slated to run in mid-2017. Turns out, it's not opening until March 18, 2018. So if you thought you missed it – you didn't!


[Iwan Baan, Torre David #2, 2011]

Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture
March 18 – June 17, 2018
Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, NY
Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture is a comprehensive survey that explores the dynamic relationship between architecture, photography, and the viewer. Seen through the lens of historical and architectural photographers from the 1930s to the present, Image Building offers a nuanced perspective on how photographs affect our understanding of the built environment and our social and personal identities. The exhibition features 57 images that explore the social, psychological, and conceptual implications of architecture through the subjective interpretation of those who captured it.

The Projective Drawing

This morning I stopped by the Austrian Cultural Forum New York to check out The Projective Drawing, a new exhibition curated by Brett Littman with ten artists responding to Robin Evans's classic 1995 book, The Projective Cast. Head on over to World-Architects to see some photos I took and learn a little bit about the show that's on display until May 13.

Today's archidose #996

Here are a few photos of GLASS (2015) in Miami Beach, Florida, by Rene Gonzalez Architect. (Photos: Maciek Lulko)

Glass Condos
Glass Condos
Glass Condos

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Book Review: John Vinci: Life and Landmarks

John Vinci: Life and Landmarks by Robert Sharoff, William Zbaren
Northwestern University Press, 2017
Hardcover, 272 pages



Being a preservation architect means toiling in relative obscurity. After all, it's the details of what is being preserved – the building, the creation of a particularly architect, the place where a famous event took place or a person lived – that are at the forefront of a preservation project, not the person in charge of its restoration. Gunny Harboe, for instance, is known by just about all architects in Chicago, but outside of the city his is hardly a common name, even though he's been responsible for the restoration of buildings by Wright, Mies, and many others. Ditto John Vinci, who's restored many notable buildings but was responsible for one in particular – the Chicago Stock Exchange Trading Room – that I first experienced as a teenager, on a field trip to the Art Institute. I learned that the space and building it came from were designed by Louis Sullivan; that the original was demolished in the 1970s; and that photographer and preservationist Richard Nickel died while salvaging some architectural artifacts from it (a floor collapsed and buried him in the basement for three weeks before his body was found). But did I know architect John Vinci was behind the removal of the original Trading Room and its reconstruction in the Art Institute addition? Nope, not until this amazing book on Vinci by Robert Sharoff and William Zbaren.