All items from Daily Dose of Architecture

Book Review: The Divided City

The Divided City: Poverty and Prosperity in America by Alan Mallach
Island Press, 2018
Paperback, 326 pages



Although I live in New York City, I haven't lived here all my life and therefore I like to think I'm more aware of some biases held by New Yorkers. With twelve years now as a NYC resident, following decades in Chicago and half a decade in Kansas, I've grown to understand, for instance, why people here are so focused on the city, as if blinders shut out the world – or at least parts not deemed worthwhile – beyond the shores of the five boroughs.

Not as cliché or hyperbolic is the way the media in NYC shapes issues well beyond the city, something natives might not be so aware of. Take gentrification, a very real issue for residents of lower-income neighborhoods that witness rezonings, public works improvements, widespread development, and then displacement. With rising rents, stagnant wages for working classes, and rising inequality, gentrification is eating into New York City's supply of affordable housing and turning parts of the city into rich enclaves lacking in diversity. But outside of NYC, San Francisco, and a few other large metropolitan centers in the US, is gentrification that big of an issue? Not  according to Alan Mallach, author of The Divided City.

Grimshaw Obscura

A highlight of Queens International 2018: Volumes (QI 2018), now on display at Queens Museum, is Volumes Cyanotype, a 100-foot-long tablecloth that documents a communal meal with the exhibition’s participating artists and which turned the building into a large camera – a camera obscura. I wrote about it for World-Architects.



Also check out the website for QI 2018 (screenshot below). Created by artist Ryan Kuo with Taekeun Kim, the website is structured about the Queens Museum building – built for the 1964 World's Fair, used briefly for the United Nations, and expanded by Grimshaw in 2013.

Today's archidose #1019

Here are some photos of the Castelar Building (1986) in Madrid, Spain, by Rafael de la Hoz & Gerardo Olivares James. (Photographs by Ximo Michavila.)

Rafael de la Hoz & Gerardo Olivares James. Perez - Llorca abogados #1
Rafael de la Hoz & Gerardo Olivares James. Perez - Llorca abogados #2
Rafael de la Hoz & Gerardo Olivares James. Perez - Llorca abogados #3

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Architecture @ Kanopy

Ever since learning about Kanopy back in June, I've been using the free, limited access made available through two libraries – NYPL and Queens Library – to watch primarily documentaries on architecture. If you live in the United States and have a card at a participating library, then you might know already that Kanopy is excellent for watching documentaries of all sorts but also independent films, foreign films, and classic movies. This isn't binge-watching on Netflix; it's expanding one's mind by watching educational, intelligent films on a variety of subjects. Below are 40 architecture films worth watching, organized by film production company.



Checkerboard Film Foundation:

Today's archidose #1018

Here are a couple photos of The Culture Yard (2010) in Elsinore, Denmark, by AART Architects. (Photographs by Martin Krause.)

kulturzentrum 18-07-05 4424
kulturzentrum 18-07-05 4427 Kopie

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October in NYC

October in New York City means two things, at least to architects: Open House New York (OHNY) and AIANY's Archtober. I've been too busy to post about these events far in advance, so below are highlights for open-access OHNY sites and some events drawn from Archtober and other sites that I'm pretty sure aren't sold out. Everything is free, unless noted otherwise.

Bronx Community College

All October, Center for Architecture
Close to the Edge: The Birth of Hip-Hop Architecture
Hip-Hop Architecture produces spaces, buildings, and environments that embody the creative energy evident in hip-hop’s first four elements: deejaying, emceeing, b-boying, and graffiti. Close to the Edge: The Birth of Hip-Hop Architecture exhibits the work of students, academics and practitioners at the center of this emerging architectural revolution.

Various days throughout October, Guggenheim Museum
The Guggenheim Celebrates Archtober This Fall
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is excited to offer special tours, workshops, and public programs that highlight Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic building design.

Opened October 4 (Thursdays through Sundays until November 18), The Modulightor Building