All items from Daily Dose of Architecture

Today's archidose #1016

Here are some photos of the Fjordenhus (2018) in Vejle, Denmark, by Sebastian Behmann with Studio Olafur Eliasson. (Photographs by Ken Lee.)

The Fjordenhus, Vejle, Denmark
The Fjordenhus, Vejle, Denmark
The Fjordenhus, Vejle, Denmark
The Fjordenhus, Vejle, Denmark

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:

Robert Irwin at Pratt

Head on over to World-Architects to read my take on Robert Irwin: Site Determined, now in display at Pratt Institute School of Architecture in Brooklyn.

Book Review: Michigan Modern

Michigan Modern: An Architectural Legacy by Brian D. Conway with photographs by James Haefner
Visual Profile Books, 2018
Hardcover, 300 pages


[Eero Saarinen's General Motors Technical Center (1956) graces the cover.]

When thinking "modern architecture" what places come to mind? In the United States, at least, it's probably the Chicago Loop's commercial architecture, or Southern California's residential architecture, or even Columbus, Indiana's surprising density of modern architecture of all types. But Michigan? Most likely that doesn't bubble to the top. Yet even a cursory glance at this lovely coffee table book of 34 buildings in Michigan from the late 1920s to earlier this decade reveals that is a huge oversight. The state -- or at least concentrated portions of its southern half -- is crammed with some amazing modern architecture.


[Frank Lloyd Wright's Dorothy Turkel House (1957) is one of the book's many highlights.]

Behemoth of the Moment

It's been six years since Phaidon released one of their gargantuan architectural atlases, meaning the publisher was overdue for yet another one. In 2004 they released the first, the Phaidon Atlas of Contemporary World Architecture; four years later came the Phaidon Atlas of 21st Century World Architecture; and in 2012 they released 20th Century World Architecture. Another atlas should have come out in 2016 to stick with the every-four-years time span. Instead, we get Atlas of Brutalist Architecture, which comes out next month.


[Images via Phaidon]

As boasted by Phaidon:

The Lower Manhattan Skyline, with & without the Twin Towers

On Tuesday, the 17th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, the Skyscraper Museum is hosting a conversation between photographers Camilo Jose Vergara and Richard Berenholtz: The Lower Manhattan Skyline, with & without the Twin Towers.



Details from the Skyscraper Museum:
Photographers Camilo Jose Vergara and Richard Berenholtz reflect on their decades of focus on New York’s changing skyline, in images and conversation.

In conjunction with the museum's new exhibition SKYLINE, two noted photographers of the New York will discuss their work over several decades of documenting the evolving identity of lower Manhattan. Berenholtz and Vergara will each show a selection of sequences that capture the lower Manhattan skyline from the same position over time and in many temporal conditions, recording in images that are authentic, poetic, and, ultimately, poignant. Join us on the evening of September 11 to remember the Twin Towers and pay tribute to what was lost and to the resilience of the city.